CONTEXTUALIZE and FORMULATE A GOOD QUESTION

PHIL | CARRILLO

CONTEXTUALIZE and FORMULATE A GOOD QUESTION

OBJECTIVE

You will construct a paragraph that contextualizes and explains the significance of a question you generate for your peer to think through, that is, with respect to their argument about the possibility of proving any claims about mask- wearing are true.

 

INTELLECTUAL EXPECTATIONS

The question you come up with should NOT be one that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no”. Rather, the question you come up with should stimulate your peer to think further and/or more deeply about their own thought, that is, as it is reflected in their Item 1 response to the Foundational Writing Assignment from Unit 1. Do NOT answer the question yourself: that is for your peer to execute. See examples questions you can ask your peers on the pages that follow.

 

 

STEPS YOU MUST TAKE TO CONSTRUCT AND POST QUALITY CONTENT

Step 1: Read about and follow with strict adherence the mandatory paragraph template below. THEN, go on learn about the different kinds of questions you can ask to reach the intellectual objective of this task (next couple of pages in this document).

Step 2: Select a peer to whom you will respond (via the Task 4C dialectic link), construct a response that shows attention to the template and lessons in this document, and post.

Make sure your selection shows attention to what I say about whom you can choose: said information is presented online via Task 4B. This document here is Task 4A.

Step 2A: Click on your selected peer’s thread via Task 4C.

Step 2B: Copy your peer’s argument

Step 2C: Click on “Reply” in your peer’s thread.

Step 2D: I should see two paragraphs: your selected peer’s argument AND THEN your response to it below it. This means you have to copy and paste their original argument when replying to said argument, placing your paragraph-long response below his or her argument.

 

READ ABOUT THE MANDATORY PARAGRAPH TEMPLATE

____START your paragraph by quoting a claim you have decided to focus on from your peer’s response (be sure to use an introductory clause as well as quotation marks in doing so). You cannot choose a conclusion, so the first statement in your peer’s argument is definitely ruled out.

____NEXT in the SAME paragraph, present a well-formulated, well-written question for your peer to address. ____LASTLY in the SAME paragraph, explain to your peer why you think it is important for him or her to address this

question. Remember: you do not answer the question: just explain why it is important to answer the question.

• Optional approved sources: in explaining the significance of your question, you might find it helpful to cite something relevant from Chapter 2 of the SmartBook reading on epistemology, since the argument topic is of interest to epistemologists. You can NOT use any other sources.

• Plagiarism warning: Be careful not to plagiarize or you will get a zero for this task or only partial points. o This means that if you use Chapter 2 in any way, you must let us know when in your response you are

doing so and you must let us from which page you are getting insights/information used to explain the significance of your question: E.g., As noted by Lawhead in our Smartbook on Page X, …

o If lifting more than three consecutive words verbatim, you must use quotation marks around said words.

• Click on Task 1 in Unit 2 to access said reading, keeping in mind that you can quote/paraphrase at most one or two sentences and that for each sentence quoted/paraphrased you must have at least two sentences

expressing ideas original to you when talking about the significance of your question.

 

 

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LEARN ABOUT THE KINDS OF QUESTIONS YOU CAN CONTEXTUALIZE AND FORMULATE IN YOUR PARAGRAPH-LONG RESPONSE

Using one of the question strategy templates below ensures you are using the template on Page 1, which is a requirement. You can borrow from the wording and use the exact structure and I will not count doing so as plagiarism.

Concept-focused Questions

1: Identify one to three statements in which a one or more words OR a WORD-PAIRS seem to name a fundamental

and powerful concept in your peer’s reasoning. Quote the statement/s in which the single words or word-pairs are

embedded (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentence/s). 2: Formulate a

question asking your peer to define the words you have identified. 3: Formulate another question that gets your peer to

elaborate on A) how their definition/s for said wordss help to make the case for their conclusion OR B) how said

definition/s connect/s to each other if you have identified different words pointing to different concepts. 4: Construct at

least one sentence that explains why it is important for them to deal with your questioning. Note that this type of set-up

requires an extra step not included in the more general template. IF YOUR PEER HAS ALREADY OFFERED A

DEFINITION FOR any version of the words “proof” or “true,” YOU CANNOT CHOOSE any version of said words for

your peer to define. Remember that you canNOT quote and focus on a conclusion from your peer when constructing

your paragraph.

 

Assumption-focused Questions

1: Identify a significant assumption that is IMPLIED but not explicitly stated in your peer’s reasoning. Quote one or

two statements that led you to uncover the assumption (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the

beginning of said sentence/s). 2: Formulate a question that gets your peer to indicate whether he/she is aware of the

assumption 3. Formulate another question that gets your peer to offer support for believing the assumption is true or at

least plausible. 4: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your questioning. Remember

that you canNOT quote and focus on a conclusion from your peer when constructing your paragraph.

Justification/Adequacy-focused Questions

1: Identity ONE premise in your peer’s argument that you think needs more support (evidence, justification, etc); quote that statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentence/s). 2: Formulate a question that gets your peer to offer evidence/support for thinking that said PREMISE is true or at least plausible, likely to be true. 3: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your questioning. Remember that you canNOT quote and focus on a conclusion from your peer when constructing your paragraph.

Objection-focused Questions

1: Identify ONE statement made by your peer in their reasoning, one to which someone might object. Quote said statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentence). 2: Articulate the possible objection in a sentence or two. 3: Formulate a question that gets your peer to explain how he or she would respond to said objection. 4: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your question. Remember that you canNOT quote and focus on a conclusion from your peer when constructing your paragraph.

 

Relevance-focused Questions

1: Identify a PREMISE in your peer’s argument that does not appear relevant to a conclusion. Quote the premise- statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentence). 2: Formulate a question that gets your peer to explain how said premise/claim is relevant to a given conclusion. 3: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your questioning. Remember that you canNOT focus on a conclusion in your peer’s first statement but in this case you can include the quote to call attention to a possible issue with a premise being relevant to said conclusion..

 

Two more strategies and three specific examples are on the next page.

 

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Illustration-focused Questions 1: Identify ONE PREMISE in your peer’s argument that you would like to better understand. Quote said statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentence). 2: Formulate a question that gets your peer to offer a detailed example AND a detailed counterexample that help you see what he or she is trying to say or talking about in said claim. 3: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your questioning. Remember that you canNOT quote and focus on a conclusion conclusion from your peer when constructing your paragraph.

Coherence-focused questions

 

Option A 1: Identify a CONNECTION your peer is making or trying to make between A) two ideas within a single PREMISE or B) across two PREMISES. The ones you identify should be ones that your peer seems to think are connected but this connection is not clear to you (or you think your peer could/should be more precise in establishing a given connection). Quote the respective statements but separately, one sentence for each statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentences). 2: Formulate a question that gets your peer to explain how those two ideas/claims connect. 3: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your questioning. Remember that you canNOT quote and focus on a conclusion from your peer when constructing your paragraph.

WARNING: you cannot use this kind of question for peers who A) said it is not rational to take a position, B) argued for opposing subconclusions and/or C) said they could not decide what to think.

Option B 1: Identify what you think might be a CONTRADICTION within your peer’s thinking. Quote the respective statements but separately, one sentence for each statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentences). 2: Formulate a question that gets your peer to comment on your contradiction claim. 3: Add a sentence explaining why it is important for him/her to deal with your questioning. While you must focus on at least one statement AFTER the first statement, a conclusion in your peer’s response, this is the one kind of questioning strategy where you can quote the first statement but its only to point out that it seems like support given after it contradicts it.

WARNING: you cannot use this option for peers who A) said it is not rational to take a position, B) argued for opposing subconclusions and/or C) said they could not decide what to think.

…three examples showing attention to the template on Page 1 of this document (that is, in virtue of using one of the

questioning strategy templates on Pages 2 and 3)…. TIP: Identify the kind of question asked in the examples below. Listen to optional video that goes with this to see what method was used to number the sentences below. Using the same method could earn course bonus points AND extra credit on top of whatever I already offer on the announcements in course update.

Example 1: (1) You use as a premise the claim that “Tookie Williams is guilty for the crimes committed.” (2) Can you explain how Williams’ being guilty is supposed to support your conclusion that “he is the same person”? (3) I think it is important to answer this question because you needed to give metaphysical support for your conclusion about being the same person but the premise I identified in your reasoning is a legal one, so your premise seems irrelevant to the conclusion.

Example 2: (1) In a premise you claim that “the children did what they had to do to survive” and then that “they are not free to decide what is necessary for survival”. (2) Can you please define what you mean by the words “free” and “survive”? (3) Can you then add some sentences that help me better understand why you think it is important to talk about freedom and survival in supporting your conclusion? (4) Answering the question is important as it seems the words I have identified name concepts central to your conlusion that “the child slaves should not be punished.”

Example 3: (1) You offered as a premise the epistemological claim that “the children knew right from wrong,” leading you to conclude that the children should be punished. (2) What leads you to believe that the premise I quoted is ITSELF true (2)? (3) I think it is important for you to answer this question since some would might find it hard to believe we are born with moral knowledge. ANSWERS Ex 1: Relevance-Focused; Question Ex 2: Concept-Focused; Question Ex 3: Justification-Focused Question

 

  • OBJECTIVE
  • INTELLECTUAL EXPECTATIONS
  • STEPS YOU MUST TAKE TO CONSTRUCT AND POST
  • QUALITY CONTENT
  • READ ABOUT THE MANDATORY PARAGRAPH TEMPLATE
  • LEARN ABOUT THE KINDS OF QUESTIONS YOU CAN CONTEXTUALIZE AND FORMULATE IN YOUR PARAGRAPH-LONG RESPONSE
    • Concept-focused Questions
    • Assumption-focused Questions
    • Justification/Adequacy-focused Questions
    • Objection-focused Questions
    • 1: Identify ONE statement made by your peer in their reasoning, one to which someone might object. Quote said statement (use quotation marks as well as an introductory clause at the beginning of said sentence). 2: Articulate the possible objectio…
    • Relevance-focused Questions
    • Illustration-focused Questions
    • Coherence-focused questions
      • Option A
      • Option B
  • …three examples showing attention to the template on Page 1 of this document (that is, in virtue of using one of the questioning strategy templates on Pages 2 and 3)….